Oh Those Naughty Reds: The Chinese Communist Party Publishes a List of No-Nos

October 23, 2015

Skulduggery in high places has been the stuff of literature for centuries: the jealousy and paranoia of Othello. The licentious behavior of the pillars of French society in Voltaire. The hypocrisy of the French establishment in the Absurd Theater of former convict Jean Genet, a man familiar with human weakness at the bottom of society.

The common folk relish lifting the veil on the folly of queens and kings. The foibles of love has been a hot topic, from Henry VIII and the beheading of wives who could not be divorced to the lovers of the virgin queen, Elizabeth I of England to the scandalous rumors about the love life of the Empress Catherine the Great of Russia to the rivalry between Julius Caesar and Marc Antony over the Queen of Egypt, Cleopatra.

The hypocrisy of those who project an image of moral rectitude, the elite of the Chinese Communist Party, provides ample opportunity for a good laugh.

In China, corruption takes many forms. The outrageous privilege of princelings, the children of the party elite, has been making headlines for decades. But something new is happening in China. The anti-corruption campaign of President Xi Jinping reprimands the daddies, the men at the top of the power structure, shaming them publicly in the state-owned media.

Dare one say it: this seems like a class structure with privilege at the top. This is heresy! That is why the present leadership has made a religion of punishing corruption. The party elite cannot be caught behaving like capitalist roaders. The communist party has been preaching against class for sixty years. Lo and behold, it looks like they are part of an emerging class structure. If this is true, what does it say about party rule? I ask you, reader.
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The New LaoGai Museum: The Two Faces of China Policy

October 8, 2015

I urge visitors to Washington to make a trip to see the Lao Gai Museum in its new quarters, at 1901 18th St. N.W.

Here is a warning: your visit will be emotionally upsetting. It will not be an afternoon of dim sum and jasmine tea. Be prepared to have your gut wrenched and go.

The museum's founder, Harry Wu, is a witness to an ugly dimension of modern Chinese history. He knows what he is talking about. He was incarcerated in the Chinese prison system for more than a decade.
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